Archive for the ‘Rotary Hoe’ Category

Double Rotary Hoe

Wednesday, August 3rd, 2011

- E. Taylor

Sampling and field days have kept us busy over the past several weeks, so there has not been much time to spend at the keyboard, but after a long hiatus from blogging I’m back with lots of pictures and video to share.

Below I have embedded a short video clip of a double rotary hoe in action at one of my on-farm trial sites in Caro, MI. Rotary hoes can be useful tools for “crust busting” before a crop emerges, but they are most frequently used as a means of controlling small weeds in organically produced field crops. The rotary hoe, or in this case double rotary hoe (2 tool bars), is run at speeds ranging from 8-11 mph when the crops are small. It pulls out weeds both in and between the rows. The quick developing roots systems of the crops allow them to remain anchored as the rotary hoe passes. Once crops get larger (e.g. V2-3 for beans), farmers usually switch to some type of cultivator which focuses only on weeds between the crop rows.

Rotary hoeing +/- Flaming in Dry Beans

Wednesday, July 28th, 2010

-E. Taylor

This is the final year of a two year study conducted at the Kellogg Biological Station looking at using flaming and rotary hoeing in combination for early season weed control in dry beans. The ‘Jaguar’ black beans were put in late this year due to rain. Weed control treatments were as follows.

Treatment

Timing*

1

2

3

4

5

6

Preemergence

Flame

Flame

Flame

Rotary Hoe

VC

Flame

Rotary Hoe

Rotary Hoe

Rotary Hoe

VC-V1

Rotary Hoe

Rotary Hoe

Rotary Hoe

V2

Cultivate

Cultivate

Cultivate

Cultivate

Cultivate

Cultivate

*Timings were based on the size of the dry beans. This video shows a quick walk-thru of the plots from Tuesday right before their first cultivation.

2009 GDD rotary hoe dry bean harvest

Monday, October 5th, 2009

-E. Taylor

Last Thursday we took advantage of one of the only nice days and harvested the black beans in our study examining rotary hoeing based on growing degree days. Things in this field had gotten fairly weedy due to rains that brought on a late flush of weeds after cultivation was complete, so we hand harvested. Looking at the raw data yields seemed to be variable, so I won’t know if there were any significant differences until I run some statistics. I will be presenting the results from this study for soybean and drybean from 2007-2009 at the 2010 Weed Science Society of America conference in Denver, CO.

Dry Bean Harvest in the Rotary Hoe Study

Thursday, October 16th, 2008

-Erin Taylor

To address organic weed control needs we conducted a rotary hoe timing trial comparing the use of growing degree days to calendar days. This week we hand harvested the black beans to compare yields among treatments; next week we will harvest the soybean portion of the trial using our two row plot combine.