Archive for the ‘Propane Flamer’ Category

Rotary hoeing +/- Flaming in Dry Beans

Wednesday, July 28th, 2010

-E. Taylor

This is the final year of a two year study conducted at the Kellogg Biological Station looking at using flaming and rotary hoeing in combination for early season weed control in dry beans. The ‘Jaguar’ black beans were put in late this year due to rain. Weed control treatments were as follows.

Treatment

Timing*

1

2

3

4

5

6

Preemergence

Flame

Flame

Flame

Rotary Hoe

VC

Flame

Rotary Hoe

Rotary Hoe

Rotary Hoe

VC-V1

Rotary Hoe

Rotary Hoe

Rotary Hoe

V2

Cultivate

Cultivate

Cultivate

Cultivate

Cultivate

Cultivate

*Timings were based on the size of the dry beans. This video shows a quick walk-thru of the plots from Tuesday right before their first cultivation.

New Extension Bulletin to be Released in December 2008

Friday, November 21st, 2008

Fine Tuning the System will be released in December 2008-Erin Taylor

Over the past few months we have been wrapping up our new extension bulletin titled “Integrated Weed Management: Fine Tuning the System” (E-3065). The bulletin, set for release in December 2008, complements the “Integrated Weed Management: One Year’s Seeding…” bulletin which was released in 2005. “Fine Tuning the System” is a 136 page, all-color booklet that examines weed management as it relates to the following topics…

  1. Diverse Crop Rotations
  2. Cover Crop Systems
  3. Manure and Compost
  4. Flaming
  5. Grazing and Other Biological Controls
  6. Weed Thresholds

In addition to these topics, 10 on-farm weed management trials from across the North Central Region and 14 new weed profiles are presented.

Excerpts from “Fine Tuning the System” will be made available at www.msuweeds.com in 2009.

The publication of this new extension bulletin was funded by: USDA Integrated Organic Program, USDA North Central Regiona Integrated Pesst Managemnt Program, SARE- North Central Region, and Project GREEEN.

 

 

KBS: 5 Days After Flaming

Thursday, June 19th, 2008

- Erin Taylor

Tuesday I returned to KBS to record data from the flaming trial. The corn, while a little damaged on the edges, has sprung back to life (see photo). Meanwhile, many of the broadleaf weeds were completely gone.

KBS: Flaming Research and the Vegetable Cover Crop Workshop

Friday, June 13th, 2008

-Erin TaylorPropane Flamer at KBS

Yesterday I headed southwest to the Kellogg Biological Station to conduct some our organic weed management research in corn and while I was there I also had the opportunity to attend the 2008 Vegetable Cover Crop Workshop put on by MSUE Vegetable AOE Team.

When using a propane flamer, the short burst of heat provided by the passing flame increases the temperature inside plant cells, causing the water to boil and the cell to rupture. Untreated and Flamed Corn one hour after flamingThe aim of our research at KBS is to find the best time of day for flaming. We flamed at 8am, Noon, 4pm, and 8pm. The corn was in the V1 stage, most of the broadleaf weeds (c. lambsquarters, c. ragweed, velvetleaf, clover spp., and pigweed spp.) were in the cotyledon to 2 true leaf stage, and the grasses were 1/8-1/2″ tall. After flaming the corn looked pretty crispy and the weeds were hard to find. The corn should outgrow the damage because the growing point is still protected below the soil surface. I will return next week to see what happens.

The cover crop workshop featured several speakers from MSU Extension and two invited speakers, Dr. Anne Verhallen from the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Dr. George Abawi from Cornell University. Cover crop related topics included biofumigants, nutrient management, soil and root health, and grass and legume mixes. After sitting in the air conditioning for a few hours we went out to tour a few field sites including the perennial wheat and rye crimping projects. The most interesting thing I learned from the day was how biofumigants “work”. When a Brassica plant (or other glucosinolate containing plant) is crushed the the glucosinolate compounds are broken down by enzymes (that are usually stored separately) and isothiocyanates are formed, which are the same chemicals found in synthetic fumigants.